Scott Wave 908-4

$675.00

SKU: sco-wave-9084

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Product Description

Scott Wave 908-4 fly rod

9’0″ 8-weight, 4-piece fly rod
Comes in a cordura-covered PVC case with separate cloth liner

 

 

Reviews

  1. I love this model. With a Rio Bonefish WF8F, it casts better loops than almost any manufacturer’s high end 9’ 8-weight except the Scott Sector and Loomis Asquith. Intuitive and rangy, most casters will pick up this rod and put it to good use without the expected “familiarization period.” Linespeed and overall power won’t match the Sector or Asquith, but I cast the rod with several fly lines and was really impressed with its accommodation of differing casting strokes and line pairings. That said, I would primarily recommend the Wave 908-4 with flats lines rather than extra-heavy Titan or Outbound Tapers. It’s strong enough to cast Redfish lines, which have short, heavy heads, and I found the mid-section to be resilient enough to tolerate an overpowered stroke, kicking back excellent line speed without tailing loops even when “stab casting.”

    John Duncan (Telluride Angler)
  2. The 908/4 Wave is quite a bit more powerful than the 6wt and 7wt in the series but it still has great feel in close. It loads well and forms a nice loop shape. Just like a lot of Scott rods, the 908/4 Wave favors a slightly slower casting stroke. You can’t quite hammer on this rod like you can the Sector, but that is to be expected from a mid-priced stick. Consistent with all of the Wave rods, the 908/4 is very stable and easy to cast. This is a well-rounded 8wt that will be equally happy in freshwater as in the salt. I’ve cast a handful of lines on this rod and the Rio Elite Bonefish WF8F and Rio Premier Redfish WF8F are two of my favorites. The rod arguably holds a tighter loop with the lighter Bonefish line but if you plan on chasing reds the Premier Redfish line is a great choice. The Redfish line sings out of the guides and loads very well in close.

    Parker Thompson (Telluride Angler)
  3. I think you would have a hard time finding a fly angler that had a problem with this 9-foot 8-weight. It is easy, even casting and awesome in every way. A trout angler that hasn’t cast a rod heavier than a 6-weight will pick up the Wave 908 without confusion. It will look and feel larger to them, but it will all make sense the first time the they rock it back. The Wave 908 handles a Rio Bonefish WF8F with complete control. I do not mean to say the rod has a set of training wheels built into it, but the loops feel like they’re leaving the rod tip on a set of train tracks down a smooth grade. You’re connected completely with line, but you aren’t hurried while casting. The blank seems to match the elongation of the line seamlessly. You get a lot of feedback through the casting stroke and the taper seems to eat up inconsistencies, kind of like running your hand over freshly rolled dough. Expert casters will appreciate the intuition of this rod. Intermediate casters will appreciate the versatility and price point of this saltwater class 9-foot 8-weight. The taper is just easy enough that you could certainly use the Wave 908 as an Alaska style salmon rod without beating up your shoulder. A Rio Redfish line tuned back the maximum distance of this rod, but provided a deeper consistent load in close. For redfish in the grass, I like the Rio Redfish on the Wave 908/4, but from the skiff I think the Rio Flats Pro is the better line for the mix of close and mid-distance shots. A true shirt slapping wind — the kind that tests your mental stability from the mere noise —might be a little much for the Wave 908/4. If you made me fish an 8-weight in that scenario, I would appreciate the Sector, but I’m probably already reaching for the 9-weight. If you’re new to the saltwater side of the sport, this is an easy rod to step into that will not let you down. If you’re a seasoned saltwater angler looking for a second 8 weight for a trip, the Wave 908/4 is a second rod that you might not put down once you pick it up.

    Richard Post (Telluride Angler)
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